Door of Mercy or Doors of Money? Will the Sacrament of Reconciliation be Scrapped?

The below mentioned extract in red colour is taken from one of the Catholic Church sites where catholics are told what one must do in order to get a plenary indulgence.

Visiting a pilgrimage church

Archbishop Joseph W. Tobin has designated SS. Peter and Paul Cathedral, 1347 N. Meridian St., in Indianapolis, and the Archabbey Church of Our Lady of Einsiedeln, 200 Hill Drive, in St. Meinrad, as the two pilgrimage churches for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.

In order to receive a plenary indulgence by visiting one of these pilgrimage churches, Catholics need to fulfill the following conditions:

  • Pass through the doors of mercy of the pilgrimage church.
  • Make a profession of faith in the church (either the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed).
  • Pray for the pope’s intentions and the pope himself.
  • Meditate on mercy while receiving Communion during a period either 20 days before or after visiting the pilgrimage church.
  • Participate in the sacrament of penance during a period either 20 days before or after visiting the pilgrimage church.

The sick and elderly who are unable to visit a pilgrimage church:

  • Make a profession of faith (either the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed).
  • Pray for the pope’s intentions and the pope himself.
  • Only if possible, receive Communion and meditate on mercy during a period either 20 days before or after making the profession of faith and praying for the pope and his intentions.
  • If receiving Communion is not possible, then a person may also participate in a televised Mass or one shown on the Internet.
  • Only if possible, participate in the sacrament of penance during a period either 20 days before or after making the profession of faith and praying for the pope and his intentions.

Incarcerated people who are unable to visit a pilgrimage church:

  • Make a profession of faith (either the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed).
  • Pray for the pope’s intentions and the pope himself.
  • Fulfill the above conditions in a jail or prison chapel. If they cannot do this or if the facility does not have a chapel, they can be carried out in a prisoner’s cell.
  • Only if possible, receive Communion and meditate on mercy during a period either 20 days before or after making the profession of faith and praying for the pope and his intentions.
  • Only if possible, participate in the sacrament of penance during a period either 20 days before or after making the profession of faith and praying for the pope and his intentions.

The meaning of plenary indulgence as taken from a catholic site

The requirements for a plenary indulgence are tougher than for a partial. After all, a plenary indulgence remove all the temporal punishment due for the sins committed up to that time.

(If you sin later, of course, the temporal punishment connected with the new sins isn’t covered by the earlier plenary indulgence, but, at least the punishment for the old sins isn’t revived.)

“To acquire a plenary indulgence,” says the Enchiridion, “it is necessary to perform the work to which the indulgence is attached and to fulfill the following three conditions: sacramental confession, Eucharistic Communion, and prayer for the intention of the Sovereign Pontiff. It is further required that all attachment to sin, even venial sin, be absent.”

Now my simple question if walking through the doors of mercy gives one  plenary indulgences then will the the sacrament of Reconciliation/confession be scrapped?

Have the doors of mercy become doors of money?

A.M.Sodder

About The Voice Of Bombay's Catholic Laity

Bombay Laity Ezekiel’s Chapter 3 Task as Watchman 17 “Son of man, I have made you a watchman for the people of Israel; so hear the word I speak and give them warning from me. 18 When I say to a wicked person, ‘You will surely die,’ and you do not warn them or speak out to dissuade them from their evil ways in order to save their life, that wicked person will die for[b] their sin, and I will hold you accountable for their blood. 19 But if you do warn the wicked person and they do not turn from their wickedness or from their evil ways, they will die for their sin; but you will have saved yourself.
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3 Responses to Door of Mercy or Doors of Money? Will the Sacrament of Reconciliation be Scrapped?

  1. Mr A M Sodder these fellows do not know what they are talking. They are very confused. All out to make a extra buck. If knighthood could have been reported to by sold in the UK for 5000 UK Pounds a piece, you see where the greed has reached.

  2. Anand says:

    Top Ten Takeaways from “Amoris Laetitia” – America Magazine
    America Magazine

    Top Ten Takeaways from “Amoris Laetitia”
    Synod on the Family
    Apr 8 2016 – 6:00am | James Martin, S.J.
    Pope Francis’s groundbreaking new document “Amoris Laetitia” (“The Joy of Love”) asks the church to meet people where they are, to consider the complexities of people’s lives and to respect people’s consciences when it comes to moral decisions. The apostolic exhortation is mainly a document that reflects on family life and encourages families. But it is also the pope’s reminder that the church should avoid simply judging people and imposing rules on them without considering their struggles.
    Using insights from the Synod of Bishops on the Family and from bishops’ conferences from around the world, Pope Francis affirms church teaching on family life and marriage, but strongly emphasizes the role of personal conscience and pastoral discernment. He urges the church to appreciate the context of people’s lives when helping them make good decisions. The goal is to help families—in fact, everyone—experience God’s love and know that they are welcome members of the church. All this may require what the pope calls “new pastoral methods” (199).
    Here are ten things to know about the pope’s groundbreaking new document.
    1. The church needs to understand families and individuals in all their complexity. The church needs to meet people where they are. So pastors are to “avoid judgements which do not take into account the complexity of various situations” (296). People should not be “pigeonholed or fit into overly rigid classifications leaving no room for personal and pastoral discernment” (298). In other words, one size does not fit all. People are encouraged to live by the Gospel, but should also be welcomed into a church that appreciates their particular struggles and treats them with mercy. “Thinking that everything is black and white” is to be avoided (305). And the church cannot apply moral laws as if they were “stones to throw at people’s lives” (305). Overall, he calls for an approach of understanding, compassion and accompaniment.
    2. The role of conscience is paramount in moral decision making. “Individual conscience needs to be better incorporated into the church’s practice in certain situations which do not objectively embody our understanding of marriage” (303). That is, the traditional belief that individual conscience is the final arbiter of the moral life has been forgotten here. The church has been “called to form consciences, not to replace them” (37). Yes, it is true, the Pope says, that a conscience needs to be formed by church teaching. But conscience does more than to judge what does or does not agree with church teaching. Conscience can also recognize with “a certain moral security” what God is asking (303). Pastors, therefore, need to help people not simply follow rules, but to practice “discernment,” a word that implies prayerful decision making (304).
    3. Divorced and remarried Catholics need to be more fully integrated into the church. How? By looking at the specifics of their situation, by remembering “mitigating factors,” by counseling them in the “internal forum,” (that is, in private conversations between the priest and person or couple), and by respecting that the final decision about the degree of participation in the church is left to a person’s conscience (305, 300). (The reception of Communion is not spelled out here, but that is a traditional aspect of “participation” in church life.) Divorced and remarried couples should be made to feel part of the church. “They are not excommunicated and should not be treated as such, since they remain part” of the church (243).
    4. All members of the family need to be encouraged to live good Christian lives. Much of “Amoris Laetitia” consists of reflections on the Gospels and church teaching on love, the family and children. But it also includes a great deal of practical advice from the pope, sometimes gleaned from exhortations and homilies regarding the family. Pope Francis reminds married couples that a good marriage is a “dynamic process” and that each side has to put up with imperfections. “Love does not have to be perfect for us to value it” (122, 113). The pope, speaking as a pastor, encourages not only married couples, but also engaged couples, expectant mothers, adoptive parents, widows, as well as aunts, uncles and grandparents. He is especially attentive that no one feels unimportant or excluded from God’s love.
    5. We should no longer talk about people “living in sin.” In a sentence that reflects a new approach, the pope says clearly, “It can no longer simply be said that all those living in any ‘irregular situation’ are living in a state of mortal sin” (301). Other people in “irregular situations,” or non-traditional families, like single mothers, need to be offered “understanding, comfort and acceptance” (49). When it comes to these people, indeed everyone, the church need to stop applying moral laws, as if they were, in the pope’s vivid phrase, “stones to throw at a person’s life” (305).
    Please support our journalism. Subscribe now!
    6. What might work in one place may not work in another. The pope is not only speaking in terms of individuals, but geographically as well. “Each country or region…can seek solutions better suited to its culture and sensitive to its traditions and local needs” (3). What makes sense pastorally in one country may even seem out of place in another. For this reason and others, as the pope says at the beginning of the document that for this reason, not every question can be settled by the magisterium, that is, the church’s teaching office (3).
    7. Traditional teachings on marriage are affirmed, but the church should not burden people with unrealistic expectations. Marriage is between one man and one woman and is indissoluble; and same-sex marriage is not considered marriage. The church continues to hold out an invitation to healthy marriages. At the same time, the church has often foisted upon people an “artificial theological ideal of marriage” removed from people’s everyday lives (36). At times these ideals have been a “tremendous burden” (122). To that end, seminarians and priests need to be better trained to understand the complexities of people’s married lives. “Ordained ministers often lack the training needed to deal with the complex problems currently facing families” (202).
    8. Children must be educated in sex and sexuality. In a culture that often commodifies and cheapens sexual expression, children need to understand sex within the “broader framework of an education for love and mutual self-giving” (280). Sadly, the body is often seen as simply “an object to be used” (153). Sex always has to be understood as being open to the gift of new life.
    9. Gay men and women should be respected. While same-sex marriage is not permitted, the pope says that he wants to reaffirm “before all else” that the homosexual person needs to be “respected in his or her dignity and treated with consideration, and ‘every sign of unjust discrimination’ is to be carefully avoided, particularly any form of aggression or violence.” Families with LGBT members need “respectful pastoral guidance” from the church and its pastors so that gays and lesbians can fully carry out God’s will in their lives (250).
    10. All are welcome. The church must help families of every sort, and people in every state of life, know that, even in their imperfections, they are loved by God and can help others experience that love. Likewise, pastors must work to make people feel welcome in the church. “Amoris Laetitia” offers the vision of a pastoral and merciful church that encourages people to experience the “joy of love.” The family is an absolutely essential part of the church, because after all, the church is a “family of families” (80).

    SOURCE:
    http://americamagazine.org/issue/top-ten-takeaways-amoris-laetitia

  3. Personally — from my childhood I have never believed in this BALONEY of indulgences — either purchased or otherwise — but like a well brought up Catholic – TILL NOW I have stayed silent and have not ever commented – My personal way is — go to GOD — ON YOUR own –If you have done some wrong –and it has harmed someone — try to rectify the harm — if you cannot — beg forgiveness from GOD for your lapse/sin — we all know that GOD is ALL LOVING and MERCIFUL & will certainly absolve/pardon the truly repentant —
    Let this not become a tamasha where we try to bribe GOD in to forgiving — a way many use is a few EXTRA bucks in the collection box —
    If GOD created you — and you believe so — also believe/accept that GOD is no FOOL to be taken in by some tricks to BUY repentance.

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